Thursday, January 24, 2008

Chicago

...has announced for 2008-2009.

I find the tone of the article a little gloomy...there are at least three things on there that sound like must-sees, Trebs or no Trebs.

Oh, here's the press release from the horse's mouth, as a pdf.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hard to see any season that includes a "Lulu" as "timid" (per the article), exactly...

pjwv said...

Maury,
Thanks for the round-up of the various seasons around the country. I was surprised and amused that the Chicago article lists San Francisco Opera as forward-thinking and innovative (they're my local group). I think the writer is confusing "technological innovation" with "artistic vision." SF Opera's upcoming season had me weeping with boredom and frustration before I reached the end of the announcement -- and I basically like the warhorses. Just not all at once and not all the time. On the other hand, and who doesn't love a plucky upstart, the new Trinity Lyric Opera in the East Bay is planning to put on Nixon in China -- at my old high school, no less. Good thing the cafeteria stage has been replaced by an "arts center."

Will said...

Even including Lulu, that's essentially a conservative season, although one that may point up how incredibly radical Tristan is [was] harmonically.

Henry Holland said...

From the article:

Conspicuous by their absence from the roster are such major singers as Renee Fleming, Anna Netrebko and Rolando Villazon

Um, so? So not having those three overexposed singers, who sing a depressingly narrow rep, is a mark against Lyric? If they *did* engage them, they'd sing the same old stuff that the writer of the article complains about!

I was surprised and amused that the Chicago article lists San Francisco Opera as forward-thinking and innovative (they're my local group)

Yeah, that stuck out too. Good point as well about confusing putting stuff in movie theatres with interesting rep.

Let's face it, American opera companies are very, very conservative in their repertoire choices because they rely on old-money donors, corporate benefactors and ticket sales to stay alive; with the public subsidies in Europe, they can risk doing something "out there" and getting 50% capacity once or twice a season. The fact that any of the major companies --hell, *any* company-- is doing Lulu is almost shocking.